miércoles, 4 de marzo de 2015

Luigi Prina / The Ships That Sail Through The Clouds

When he was just 16 years old Luigi Prina entered and won a national aircraft modeling competition. When he went to collect the prize money the organizers asked the boy why his father couldn’t come and collect it himself. Nearly fifty years later the now successful architect met a painter and boat builder named Eugenio Tomiolo and while they were talking made a bet that perhaps Prina could take one of his small model ships and make it fly like an airplane. Tomolio accepted and it wasn’t long before a small flying boat was whirring in circles around his small studio that coincidentally had clouds painted on the ceiling. A new passion was born and Prina has since dedicated nearly 20 years of his later life to building flying model boats, bicycles and other unconventional aircraft. 

via blazediaries 



lunes, 2 de marzo de 2015

New Furniture For You / NICHOLAS GARDNER

Nicholas is a London-based designer, and recent Royal College of Art graduate. His studio New Furniture For You creates functional products for the market; intended for a parallel, hyper-real consumer space. A highly-referential world where reproductions and iterations of classic typologies and archetypes are removed from their source material; rendering a new set of aesthetic values, that are arguably a much closer representation of our ‘desires’. These examples reveal truths, inconsistencies and functional rationalities about modern consumer tastes and culture. Drawing from (post)internet, DIY and corporate culture his work often employs a forceful intersection between cheaply produced ready-mades and components with a polished design sensibility.
So far Nicholas has been showing work at the V&A and Christie’s in London, at Milan, London and Stockholm Design Week and been featured in Wallpaper and Icon Magazine as the world’s best graduate talent. via blazediaries

viernes, 27 de febrero de 2015

Jan Hardisty

       via blazediaries       

miércoles, 25 de febrero de 2015

Pools by Kelly Klein



jueves, 19 de febrero de 2015

House in Hikone

A white oval cylinder with forty-two windows, in which wooden boxes and a floor were inserted to create a living space: is the house designed by Tato Architects for a young family in Japan.
House in Hikone is a single family house for a young couple and their children in Hikone, Shiga.
A residential area so far existing of mainly grassland, but soon to be occupied by ready built houses. The challenge was to seek a proper built form there, which will resolve any surrounding environment, keeping the memory of grassland. It resulted in the white oval cylinder with forty-two windows, in which wooden boxes and a floor were inserted to create a living space. It was placed diagonally in the site, remaining space between adjoining houses.
Many windows segment the view and make the facade work as a filter. In this way, the house is ready for any change in the surrounding environment. The outer wall, on which windows are placed equally, mediate a variety of living issues, while it is independent from them.
Intentional division of stairs makes a landing in this house, floating delicately 750mm above the floor. With this choice Tato Architects tried to represent this ambiguous feeling of belonging to neither of the floors not by actual landing, but by other manipulation such as window arrangement. While they have a conventional scale, the size of the opening is easy to be manipulated, as they are not restricted by scale of physical bodies. Three rows of windows are placed equally, expecting to bring a scale gap in its size, and a mystical feeling of floating, which is similar to the one felt on landings.

via domusweb

miércoles, 18 de febrero de 2015

Residencia Jose da Silva Neto

Residencia Jose da Silva Neto / Brazilia / 1973

João Filgueiras Lima
Photo Joana França


miércoles, 11 de febrero de 2015

Ugly Belgian Houses

Just as William Blake once proffered the philosophy, "to see a world in a grain of sand", this Bank Holiday Monday we are finding joy in the most mundane of subjects. Introducing our latest not-so-guilty pleasure, aptly named, Ugly Belgian Houses. With captions as witty as its subjects are hideous – as the creator Hannes Coudenys somewhat forthrightly states, "Because most Belgian houses are ugly. Even mine." – browsing through real estate has never been so entertaining. Pre-order the book here.